Resolve to Manage Your Anger 
(Rick Warren)

The Bible says, “Love is not easily angered.” It doesn’t say love never gets angry at all. In fact, sometimes the loving thing to do is to get angry. Jesus became angry in the Temple when he saw his Father’s house being run like a marketplace. 

At the same time, we can love someone and still get angry at that person. Sometimes the anger may be “righteous’ and sometimes it may be “selfish,’ but the people we love the most are the ones most likely to make us angry. 

My point is — God placed the capacity to get angry into your biological makeup. Being angry is not a sin; it can become a sin if we allow it to push us into destructive behavior, but the emotion itself is not a sin. The Bible says even God gets angry. 

You can’t avoid anger, but you can learn how to control it. You can resolve to manage it, so it becomes an asset, rather than a liability. This means you quit making excuses and justifying your anger: “That’s just me. I just blow up. I can’t control it.’ 

Anger can be controlled. Have you ever been in a fight with someone and things are getting pretty loud, but, then, the telephone rings? Notice how quickly you can manage your anger! You’ve got a lot more control over your anger than you think you do. Resolve to manage it, and, then, confess, “I can control it with God’s help.”

Amen amen amen

Resolve to Manage Your Anger
(Rick Warren)

The Bible says, “Love is not easily angered.” It doesn’t say love never gets angry at all. In fact, sometimes the loving thing to do is to get angry. Jesus became angry in the Temple when he saw his Father’s house being run like a marketplace.

At the same time, we can love someone and still get angry at that person. Sometimes the anger may be “righteous’ and sometimes it may be “selfish,’ but the people we love the most are the ones most likely to make us angry.

My point is — God placed the capacity to get angry into your biological makeup. Being angry is not a sin; it can become a sin if we allow it to push us into destructive behavior, but the emotion itself is not a sin. The Bible says even God gets angry.

You can’t avoid anger, but you can learn how to control it. You can resolve to manage it, so it becomes an asset, rather than a liability. This means you quit making excuses and justifying your anger: “That’s just me. I just blow up. I can’t control it.’

Anger can be controlled. Have you ever been in a fight with someone and things are getting pretty loud, but, then, the telephone rings? Notice how quickly you can manage your anger! You’ve got a lot more control over your anger than you think you do. Resolve to manage it, and, then, confess, “I can control it with God’s help.”

Amen amen amen

Don’t Compare or Conform 
(Rick Warren)

There are two reasons why you should never compare your shape, ministry, or the results of your ministry with anyone else. 

First, you will always be able to find someone who seems to be doing a better job than you and you will become discouraged. Or, you will always be able to find someone who doesn’t seem as effective as you and you will get full of pride. 

Either attitude will take you out of service and rob you of your job. 

Paul said it is foolish to compare ourselves with others. He said, “We do not dare to classify or compare ourselves with some who commend themselves. When they measure themselves by themselves and compare themselves with themselves, they are not wise.” (2 Corinthians 10:12 NIV) 

Paul often had to deal with critics who misunderstood and maligned his service. His response was always the same: Avoid comparisons, resist exaggerations, and seek only God’s commendation. 

One of the reasons Paul was used so greatly by God was that he refused to be distracted by criticism or by comparing his ministry with others or by being drawn into fruitless debates about his ministry. John Bunyan, the author of “Pilgrims Progress,” said, “If my life is fruitless, it doesn’t matter who praises me, and if my life is fruitful, it doesn’t matter who criticizes me.”

Amen amen amen!

Don’t Compare or Conform
(Rick Warren)

There are two reasons why you should never compare your shape, ministry, or the results of your ministry with anyone else.

First, you will always be able to find someone who seems to be doing a better job than you and you will become discouraged. Or, you will always be able to find someone who doesn’t seem as effective as you and you will get full of pride.

Either attitude will take you out of service and rob you of your job.

Paul said it is foolish to compare ourselves with others. He said, “We do not dare to classify or compare ourselves with some who commend themselves. When they measure themselves by themselves and compare themselves with themselves, they are not wise.” (2 Corinthians 10:12 NIV)

Paul often had to deal with critics who misunderstood and maligned his service. His response was always the same: Avoid comparisons, resist exaggerations, and seek only God’s commendation.

One of the reasons Paul was used so greatly by God was that he refused to be distracted by criticism or by comparing his ministry with others or by being drawn into fruitless debates about his ministry. John Bunyan, the author of “Pilgrims Progress,” said, “If my life is fruitless, it doesn’t matter who praises me, and if my life is fruitful, it doesn’t matter who criticizes me.”

Amen amen amen!

Celebrate Your Uniqueness 
(Rick Warren)

Your shape was sovereignly determined by God for his purpose, so you shouldn’t resent it or reject it. Instead of trying to reshape yourself to be like someone else, you should celebrate the shape God has given only to you. “Christ has given each of us special abilities - whatever he wants us to have out of his rich storehouse of gifts.” (Ephesians 4:7 LB) 

Part of accepting your shape is recognizing your limitations. Nobody is good at everything, and no one is called to be everything. We all have defined roles. Don’t be envious of the runner in the lane next to you; just focus on finishing your race. God wants you to enjoy using the shape he has given you. 

Satan will try to steal the joy of service from you in a couple of ways: by tempting you to compare your ministry with others, and by tempting you to conform your ministry to the expectations of others. Both are deadly traps that will distract you from serving in the ways God intended. Whenever you lose your joy in ministry, start by considering if either one of these temptations is the cause.

Amen amen amen!

Celebrate Your Uniqueness
(Rick Warren)

Your shape was sovereignly determined by God for his purpose, so you shouldn’t resent it or reject it. Instead of trying to reshape yourself to be like someone else, you should celebrate the shape God has given only to you. “Christ has given each of us special abilities - whatever he wants us to have out of his rich storehouse of gifts.” (Ephesians 4:7 LB)

Part of accepting your shape is recognizing your limitations. Nobody is good at everything, and no one is called to be everything. We all have defined roles. Don’t be envious of the runner in the lane next to you; just focus on finishing your race. God wants you to enjoy using the shape he has given you.

Satan will try to steal the joy of service from you in a couple of ways: by tempting you to compare your ministry with others, and by tempting you to conform your ministry to the expectations of others. Both are deadly traps that will distract you from serving in the ways God intended. Whenever you lose your joy in ministry, start by considering if either one of these temptations is the cause.

Amen amen amen!